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Devious Collection 10 by giantstorylover


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January 22, 2013
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I found an article earlier today on facebook that was being shared around. According to those friends of mine who shared it, it was being shared for all the wrong reasons. It's linked in the description below. Please read it before continuing on.

Read it? All of it? *ahem* Good. Now then...

Here's my problem with this. Other than the fact that this person is, at very least, a judgmental, big-headed, tactless snob of an elitist, my overlaying issue with this article is that this person has taken something that she calls several times as an "artform" and makes it, not about the art, but about how people who are bad at said art are offending HER. This article isn't an essay to make potential first-time cosplayers better. This is an article about some snobby, stuck up bitch with a superiority complex telling everyone that they'd better shape up and learn themselves somethin' before it really gets on her nerves.

Lady. Your tits. Calm them. I bet you weren't a star seamstress at fourteen. I have my own share of awful cosplays in my past. And so what if someone is overweight? Or perhaps a different skin color? Or a different gender? Are there some cosplays that don't fit the body type of the person that's wearing them? Sure, but what does that mean? That you should stop cosplaying all together? Cosplay has a certain toxicity to it, both in culture and practice, but beyond the cliques and the judgement, beyond the attention whoring and the vying for camera time, there is something else there.

Fun. Fun and the opportunity to meet other people with the same interests and fandom as your own. This self-proclaimed expert "Liz" asserts the fact that by putting together a bad cosplay, you are essentially "pissing on my fandom" and that, kiddies, is an original sin. Of course, it's perfectly all right for this absolutely flawless archangel of an artist to piss all over yours.

And so, in response, here are MY rules to cosplay. I give these rules as an actor, a geek, an author and over-all artist.

#1: Time spent is not time wasted. Research is of course a key element in creating anything, cosplay or otherwise. This was one of the few points where Liz and I agree. However, according to our dear friend, research is something that is so staunchly required that it is punishable by flogging if you don't know every single detail of both your character and the world around them. My opinion? Cosplay only what you love, or with those who matter to you. Those are the only people who should have any weight on who you decide to be.

#2: A labor of love. There should always be a level of commitment and earnestness put behind every cosplay. The more love you put into a costume, the more it will shine through when that big day approaches. But building should never be a chore. If every little detail (no matter how frustrating it may be) does not excite you, why are you doing it?

#3: Know your body. I am no super model, I'll tell you that much. And honestly? Neither is Liz. In the real world, a lot of us can't devote our lives to shrinking down to Haruhi Suzumia's size for good. At the moment, I myself am actually trying to lose a little weight for a cosplay I'll be doing this ComiCon, but that's only because the love and admiration I have for the character I'll be portraying is so great that I'm actually willing to give up sugar and sweets in order to make it work. If you are not willing, forcing yourself to try and change to fit the costumes of fictional characters for the approval of strangers will only land you in depression and self loathing. So if you are a different color, a little over or under weight, not nearly as buff, do not fret. Mold the cosplay to fit your body, not the other way around.

#4: Crossplay is OK. This is where I and Miss Lizzy completely disagree. Now let me tell you, as a female with a DD bra size, it's not easy. Often times, I have to make sure the shirt I wear is frumpy enough to hide myself even when I DO bind. However, it's worth it because the boy characters I do end up cosplaying are either interesting, funny, or awesome enough to warrant tying my chestacles up for the day. Cosplay is all about losing yourself in a fantasy world. Why should something as simple as gender stand in its way?

#5: Rule 63. Another point where she and I vastly differ. As I mentioned before, I'll be revealing a new cosplay this summer at ComiCon. That cosplay? Kratos from my favorite video games of all time: the God of War series. But even with the greatest binding in the world, I would never, ever be able to pull him off. And so I decided I will do a female version of the character who I adore so deeply. I have designed an appropriate feminine version of his outfit, and have plans on putting an entire half year's worth of effort to perfect it before July. And yet, according to Liz, such effort should be shunned, mocked, degraded and dismissed because, as she puts it: "no one is impressed, more people are disgusted than anything else."

And that's it. Those are the only commandants I have for anyone to potentially follow. I am not pretending to be an advanced cosplayer. I still have a long way to go. But when you forget the essential elements and wonder that drew you into cosplay in the first place, well, quite frankly, you become someone poisonous, to the point of alienation and down right ugliness.

Someone, to put it plainly, like Liz.
I posted this as a journal, but honestly, it needs a brighter spotlight.

Here's the article: [link]
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:iconakidearest:
akidearest Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013
-smashes head on cash register-
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:icondarkdiarypeeker:
DarkDiaryPeeker Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you! I completely agree! :D
Reply
:iconstained-steel:
Stained-Steel Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013
I think your response to that arrogant bitch is perfect. Honestly, some of my happiest memories of cons are of dressing up as Lina Inverse in stuff I found for $8 at the local thrift shop and a cape my mom bought me from Walmart. I ran around the con, yapped at people who cosplayed from the same series, and it was the bestest best moment in time evar. I'm sorry the little drow elf she met didn't have the same experience.

It's cosplay. You're dressing up as an animated character to hang out with people doing the same thing. If you're having fun, then you're doing it right.

TL;DR: your reply hits the nail on the head and I love you for it.
Reply
:iconredbellemage:
RedBelleMage Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
I read the article. I would like to ask this elitist who died and made her the Queen of Cosplay?
Reply
:iconabsentmindedgenis:
AbsentmindedGenis Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013
Never saw the original page, but here's a new link to Liz's Rules of Cosplay. (Its on pastebin)
[link]

The internet is great, isn't it? Chances are, once you post something as vile as this article, it'll never go away.
Reply
:iconkaralora:
Karalora Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Shorter Liz: If your appearance and sewing skills aren't perfect, don't bother.

Anyone else notice that between "Don't cosplay outside your body type" and "Don't crossplay" she basically forbids fat women from cosplaying at all? Because let's be honest--there are no fat women in geek fiction. (Or at least there are very, very few.) On the guys' side, there are a few stout old warriors and jolly comic types, but a fat woman is considered like the ultimate in hideousness and no one ever portrays them. And it would seem Liz agrees with that assessment. I wouldn't be surprised if she thinks fat people should never appear in public at all, let alone in attention-getting costumes.
Reply
:iconlilwildguy:
lilwildguy Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013
I'm happy I found this. MY first con was a few weeks ago, more importantly to me my first cosplay. It sucked, and I knew that. But I went with it and had fun, and you know what? I didn't get mocked or ridiculed or whatever. There weren't even any second looks, or whispers. I've dealt with morons talking behind my back too, so I know what to look for.
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:iconfyre-medi:
Fyre-Medi Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013
Here, here. :D
Reply
:iconeurodraken:
EuroDraken Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013
I don't get how it comes to this. Art is subjective everyone has their own interpretations about it. Whether or not they are good at it they have invested their time to create something, That's love and dedication. Cosplay is a great form to have fun. whether or not it's accurate doesn't matter as much. It should all be about having fun
Reply
:iconmultifish:
multifish Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2013
Astonishing! Simply astonishing! Who doesn't like good ol' crossplay?!

Although, of course, the whole article is horrendous. It's just another social media hiccup that seems to have gained steam. HOPEFULLY things like this will not lead to an influx of snobbish jerks at conventions. Surely cosplay is about the fanaticism you feel for that character! Heck, I've never cosplayed before, but there have been plenty of characters I'd like to, simply to show how much I admire them (for any reason from their coolness to hilarity) It's almost the same mindset as wearing a pop culture t-shirt, just to a much higher extent as it requires FAR more effort.

I'm super tired right now, so I heavily skimmed both articles, but I'm sure conventions will continue to be an enjoyable and constructive experiences for cosplayers! This years here in Australia are set to be wonderful!
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